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The controversy over Huawei’s involvement in the 5G telecom gear market ratcheted up a notch this week. U.S. officials said they have evidence that the Chinese equipment giant has had access to backdoors inside mobile carrier networks for more than 10 years. Officials are trying to make the case that the U.S. and its allies should ban Huawei from supplying infrastructure for 5G networks going forward, due to what they say is the possibility of widespread, Beijing-backed espionage. Huawei rejected the allegations, and other countries around the world are continuing to build networks using the vendor’s gear despite the U.S. position on the vendor. But security experts say that 5G supply-chain concerns should be taken seriously – whether it’s in the context of Huawei or not. “A backdoor to a lawful intercept interface could yield a treasure trove of information to a malicious actor — including the current location of a target, details including when and where a call was placed, and even the ability to eavesdrop or listen into a current call,” Russ Mohr, engineer and Apple evangelist at MobileIron, told Threatpost. “A backdoor is an extremely valuable resource to a bad actor, and it is likely that it would be much more valuable as an asset to collect data than as a mounting point for an attack — although it may provide an opportunity to inject ransomware into a 5G network targeting a mobile carrier.” Latest Allegations The feds told the Wall Street Journal that Huawei can make…

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