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SAN FRANCISCO — A serious vulnerability in Wi-Fi chips has been discovered that affects billions of devices worldwide, according to researchers. It allows attackers to eavesdrop on Wi-Fi communications. The bug (CVE-2019-15126) stems from the use of an all-zero encryption key in chips made by Broadcom and Cypress, according to researchers at ESET, which results in data decryption. This breaks the WPA2-Personal and WPA2-Enterprise security protocols. The vulnerable chips are found in smartphones, tablets and laptops (using Broadcom silicon) and in IoT gadgets (Cypress chips), including several generations of products from Amazon (Echo, Kindle), Apple (iPhone, iPad, MacBook), Google (Nexus), Samsung (Galaxy), Raspberry (Pi 3), Xiaomi (RedMi). ESET also found the bug to be present in access points (APs) and routers by Asus and Huawei. In all, more than a billion devices are affected, researchers estimated. ESET dubbed the vulnerability “KrØØk” to incorporate the zeros, and also because it’s related to the KRACK attack, a.k.a. Key Reinstallation Attacks, discovered in 2017. The KRACK approach was an industry-wide problem in the WPA and WPA2 protocols for securing Wi-Fi that could cause “complete loss of control over data,” according to ICS-CERT. It explained in an advisory at the time that KRACK “could allow an attacker to execute a ‘man-in-the-middle’ attack, enabling the attacker within radio range to replay, decrypt or spoof frames.” According to ESET, “[it] found KrØØk to…

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