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New research into the malware that set the stage for the megabreach at IT vendor SolarWinds shows the perpetrators spent months inside the company's software development labs honing their attack before inserting malicious code into updates that SolarWinds then shipped to thousands of customers. More worrisome, the research suggests the insidious methods used by the intruders to subvert the company's software development pipeline could be repurposed against many other major software providers. In a blog post published Jan. 11, SolarWinds said the attackers first compromised its development environment on Sept. 4, 2019. Soon after, the attackers began testing code designed to surreptitiously inject backdoors into Orion, a suite of tools used by many Fortune 500 firms and a broad swath of the federal government to manage their internal networks. Image: SolarWinds. According to SolarWinds and a technical analysis from CrowdStrike, the intruders were trying to work out whether their "Sunspot" malware — designed specifically for use in undermining SolarWinds' software development process — could successfully insert their malicious "Sunburst" backdoor into Orion products without tripping any alarms or alerting Orion developers. In October 2019, SolarWinds pushed an update to their Orion customers that contained the modified test code. By February 2020, the intruders had used Sunspot to inject the Sunburst backdoor into the Orion source code, which was then digitally signed by…

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