When Your Smart ID Card Reader Comes With Malware

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Millions of U.S. government employees and contractors have been issued a secure smart ID card that enables physical access to buildings and controlled spaces, and provides access to government computer networks and systems at the cardholder's appropriate security level. But many government employees aren't issued an approved card reader device that lets them use these cards at home or remotely, and so turn to low-cost readers they find online. What could go wrong? Here's one example. A sample Common Access Card (CAC). Image: Cac.mil. KrebsOnSecurity recently heard from a reader — we'll call him "Mark" because he wasn't authorized to speak to the press — who works in IT for a major government defense contractor and was issued a Personal Identity Verification (PIV) government smart card designed for civilian employees. Not having a smart card reader at home and lacking any obvious guidance from his co-workers on how to get one, Mark opted to purchase a $15 reader from Amazon that said it was made to handle U.S. government smart cards. The USB-based device Mark settled on is the first result that currently comes up one when searches on Amazon.com for "PIV card reader." The card reader Mark bought was sold by a company called Saicoo, whose sponsored Amazon listing advertises a "DOD Military USB Common Access Card (CAC) Reader" and has more than 11,700 mostly positive ratings. The Common Access Card (CAC) is the standard identification for active duty uniformed service…

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