In January 2020, the Spanish mobile phone forum HTC Mania suffered a data breach of the vBulletin based site. The incident exposed 1.5M member email addresses, usernames, IP addresses, dates of birth and salted MD5 password hashes and password histories. Data from the breach was subsequently redistributed on popular hacking websites.

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In April 2020, the account hijacking and SIM swapping forum OGUsers suffered their second data breach in less than a year. As with the previous breach, the exposed data included email and IP addresses, usernames, private messages and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes. A total of 263k email addresses across user accounts and other tables were posted to a rival hacking forum.

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In March 2017, the Flash game based on the Yu-Gi-Oh trading card game Dueling Network suffered a data breach. The site itself was taken offline in 2016 due to a cease-and-desist order but the forum remained online for another year. The data breach exposed usernames, IP and email addresses and passwords stored as MD5 hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “burger vault”.

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In February 2020, the affiliate marketing network Tamodo suffered a data breach which was subsequently shared on a popular hacking forum. The incident exposed almost 500k accounts including names, email addresses, dates of birth and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. Tamodo failed to respond to multiple attempts to report the breach via published communication channels.

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In January 2018, the Indian property website PropTiger suffered a data breach which resulted in a 3.46GB database file being exposed and subsequently shared extensively on a popular hacking forum 2 years later. The exposed data contained both user records and login histories with over 2M unique customer email addresses. Exposed data also included additional personal attributes such as names, dates of birth, genders, IP addresses and passwords stored as MD5 hashes. PropTiger advised they believe the usability of the data is “limited” due to how certain data attributes were generated and stored. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In September 2019, the Halloween costume store The Halloween Spot suffered a data breach. Originally misattributed to fancy dress store Smiffys, the breach contained 13GB of data with over 10k unique email addresses alongside names, physical and IP addresses, phone numbers and order histories. The Halloween Spot advised customers the breach was traced back to “an old shipping information database”.

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In February 2020, the gaming website AnimeGame suffered a data breach. The incident affected 1.4M subscribers and exposed email addresses, usernames and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes. The data was subsequently shared on a popular hacking forum and was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In February 2020, Israeli marketing company Straffic exposed a database with 140GB of personal data. The publicly accessible Elasticsearch database contained over 300M rows with 49M unique email addresses. Exposed data also included names, phone numbers, physical addresses and genders. In their breach disclosure message, Straffic stated that “it is impossible to create a totally immune system, and these things can occur”.

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In February 2020, the online store for consumer electronics wraps Slickwraps suffered a data breach. The incident resulted in the exposure of 858k unique email addresses across customer records and newsletter subscribers. Additional impacted data included names, physical addresses, phone numbers and purchase histories.

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In July 2019, MGM Resorts discovered a data breach of one of their cloud services. The breach included 10.6M guest records with 3.1M unique email addresses stemming back to 2017. The exposed data included email and physical addresses, names, phone numbers and dates of birth and was subsequently shared on a popular hacking forum in February 2020 where it was extensively redistributed. The data was provided to HIBP by Under The Breach.

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