In April 2021, a large data set of 533 million Facebook users was made freely available for download. Encompassing approximately 20% of Facebook's subscribers, the data was allegedly obtained by exploiting a vulnerability Facebook advises they rectified in August 2019. The primary value of the data is the association of phone numbers to identities; whilst each record included phone, only 2.5 million contained an email address. Most records contained names and genders with many also including dates of birth, location, relationship status and employer.

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In January 2021, the lead generation company Astoria Company allegedly suffered a data breach which exposed over 11M unique email addresses. The data was discovered by Night Lion Security and contained an extensive amount of personal information including names, physical and IP addresses, phone numbers and dates of birth. Some records also contained social security numbers, drivers license details, personal financial information and health-related data, depending on where the information was sourced from. When approached by the press, Astoria did not confirm the origin of the breach and it has consequently been flagged as “unverified” in HIBP.

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In March 2020, the self-proclaimed “kinder, smarter social network” Liker suffered a data breach, allegedly in retaliation for the Gab data breach and scraping of data from Parler. The site remained offline after the breach which exposed 465k email addresses in addition to names, dates of birth, education levels, private messages, security questions and answers in plain text, passwords stored as bcrypt hashes and other personal data attributes. Liker did not respond when contacted about the breach.

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In December 2020, the Oklahoma state Tourism and Recreation Department suffered a data breach. The incident exposed 637k email addresses across a variety of tables including age ranges against brochure orders and dates of birth against contest entries. Genders, names and physical addresses were also exposed. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “badhou3a”.

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In January 2021, Oxfam Australia was the victim of a data breach which exposed 1.8M unique email addresses of supporters of the charity. The data was put up for sale on a popular hacking forum and also included names, phone numbers, addresses, genders and dates of birth. A small number of people also had partial credit card data exposed (the first 6 and last 3 digits of the card, plus card type and expiry) and in some cases the bank name, account number and BSB were also exposed. The data was subsequently made freely available on the hacking forum later the following month.

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In August 2020, the Dutch ticketing service Ticketcounter inadvertently published a database backup to a publicly accessible location where it was then found and downloaded in February 2021. The data contained 1.9M unique email addresses which were offered for sale on a hacking forum alongside names, physical and IP addresses, genders, dates of birth, payment histories and in some cases, bank account numbers. Ticketcounter was later held to ransom with the threat of the breached being released publicly. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to redredred@riseup.net.

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In February 2021, a series of “free” VPN services were breached including SuperVPN and GeckoVPN, exposing over 20M records. The data appeared together in a single file with a small number of records also included from FlashVPN, suggesting that all three brands may share the same platform. Impacted data also included email addresses, the country logged in from and the date and time each login occurred alongside device information including the make and model, IMSI number and serial number. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to redredred@riseup.net.

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In approximately 2019 or 2020, the Lithuanian movie streaming service Filmai.in suffered a data breach exposing 645k email addresses, usernames and plain text passwords.

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In February 2021, a series of egregiously bad security flaws were identified in the NurseryCam system designed for parents to remotely monitor their children whilst attending nursery. The flaws led to the exposure of over 10k parent records before the service was shut down. The email addresses alone were provided to Have I Been Pwned to ensure parents were properly notified of the incident.

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In December 2020, the UK power company People's Energy suffered a data breach. The breach exposed almost 7GB of files containing 359k unique email addresses along with names, phones numbers, physical addresses and dates of birth. The incident also included People's Energy staff email addresses and bcrypt password hashes (no customer passwords were exposed). The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to pompompurin@riseup.net.

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