In March 2021, 4 million records sourced from IDC Games were shared on a public hacking forum. The data included usernames, email addresses and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes.

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In mid-2021, Risk Based Security reported on a database sourced from Ducks Unlimited being traded online. The data dated back to January 2021 and contained 1.3M unique email addresses across both a membership list and a list of website users. Impacted data included names, phones numbers, physical addresses, dates of birth and passwords stored as unsalted MD5 hashes.

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In October 2021, security researcher Bob Diachenko discovered an exposed database he attributed to ActMobile, the operators of Dash VPN and FreeVPN. The exposed data included 1.6 million unique email addresses along with IP addresses and password hashes, all of which were subsequently leaked on a popular hacking forum. Although usage of the service was verified by HIBP subscribers, ActMobile denied the data was sourced from them and the breach has subsequently been flagged as “unverified”.

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During October 2021, 3.1 million email addresses with accounts on the cryptocurrency market capitalisation website CoinMarketCap were discovered being traded on hacking forums. Whilst the email addresses were found to correlate with CoinMarketCap accounts, it's unclear precisely how they were obtained. CoinMarketCap has provided the following statement on the data: “CoinMarketCap has become aware that batches of data have shown up online purporting to be a list of user accounts. While the data lists we have seen are only email addresses (no passwords), we have found a correlation with our subscriber base. We have not found any evidence of a data leak from our own servers — we are actively investigating this issue and will update our subscribers as soon as we have any new information.”

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In October 2021, a database backup taken from the 3D model sharing service Thingiverse began extensively circulating within the hacking community. Dating back to October 2020, the 36GB file contained 228 thousand unique email addresses, mostly alongside comments left on 3D models. The data also included usernames, IP addresses, full names and passwords stored as either unsalted SHA-1 or bcrypt hashes. In some cases, physical addresses was also exposed. Thingiverse's owner, MakerBot, is aware of the incident but at the time of writing, is yet to issue a disclosure statement. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In September 2021, a publicly accessible PostgresSQL database belonging to the Playbook service was identified. Run by VC firm Plug and Play Ventures, the database had been exposed since October 2020 and contained more than 50 thousand unique email addresses along with names, phone numbers, job titles and passwords stored as PBKDF2 hashes. It took more than 2 weeks after being notified of the exposed data to properly secure it. It's unknown whether Plug and Play Ventures notified impacted individuals as they ceased responding to queries from the press.

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In October 2021, the fantasy premier league (soccer) website Fantasy Football Hub suffered a data breach that exposed 66 thousand unique email addresses. The data included names, usernames, IP addresses, transactions and passwords stored as WordPress MD5 hashes.

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In September 2021, the Republican Party of Texas was hacked by a group claiming to be “Anonymous” in retaliation for the state's controversial abortion ban. The September defacement was followed by a leak of data and documents which included material from the hosting provider Epik. Impacted data included over 72 thousand unique email addresses across various tables, some also including names, geographic location data, IP addresses and browser user agents.

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During the first half of 2021, LinkedIn was targeted by attackers who scraped data from hundreds of millions of public profiles and later sold them online. Whilst the scraping did not constitute a data breach nor did it access any personal data not intended to be publicly accessible, the data was still monetised and later broadly circulated in hacking circles. The scraped data contains approximately 400M records with 125M unique email addresses, as well as names, geographic locations, genders and job titles. LinkedIn specifically addresses the incident in their post on An update on report of scraped data.

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In September 2021, the Thai-based English language teaching website Ajarn discovered they'd been the victim of a data breach dating back to December 2018. The breach was self-submitted to HIBP and included 266k email addresses, names, genders, phone numbers and other personal information. Hashed passwords were also impacted in the breach.

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