In December 2020, the car dealership service provider DriveSure suffered a data breach. The incident resulted in 26GB of data being downloaded and later shared on a hacking forum. Impacted personal information included 3.6 million unique email addresses, names, phone numbers and physical addresses. Vehicle data was also exposed and included makes, models, VIN numbers and odometer readings. A small number of passwords stored as bcrypt hashes were also included in the data set.

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In March 2021, the mobile parking app service ParkMobile suffered a data breach which exposed 21 million customers' personal data. The impacted data included email addresses, names, phone numbers, vehicle licence plates and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. The following month, the data appeared on a public hacking forum where it was extensively redistributed.

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In March 2021, the Brazilian EdTech company Descomplica suffered a data breach which was subsequently posted to a popular hacking forum. The data included almost 5 million email addresses, names, the first 6 and last 4 digits and the expiry date of credit cards, purchase histories and password hashes.

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In August 2020, the workout tracking app Jefit suffered a data breach. The data was subsequently sold within the hacking community and included over 9 million email and IP addresses, usernames and passwords stored as either vBulletin or argon2 hashes. Several million cracked passwords later appeared in broad circulation.

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In October 2020, the Indian grocery platform bigbasket suffered a data breach that exposed over 20 million customer records. The data was originally sold before being leaked publicly in April the following year and included email, IP and physical addresses, names, phones numbers, dates of birth passwords stored as Django(SHA-1) hashes.

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In March 2021, the manga fan site MangaDex suffered a data breach that resulted in the exposure of almost 3 million subscribers. The data included email and IP addresses, usernames and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. The data was subsequently circulated within hacking groups.

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In September 2020, the cashback reward program ShopBack suffered a data breach. The incident exposed over 20 million unique email addresses along with names, phone numbers, country of residence and passwords stored as salted SHA-1 hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In April 2021, the market research surveys company ClearVoice Surveys had a publicly facing database backup from 2015 taken and redistributed on a popular hacking forum. The data included 15M unique email addresses across more than 17M rows of data that also included names, physical and IP addresses, genders, dates of birth and plain text passwords. ClearVoice Surveys advised they were aware of the breach and confirmed its authenticity.

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In April 2021, the Spanish retailer Phone House allegedly suffered a ransomware attack that also exposed significant volumes of customer data. Attributed to the Babuk ransomware, a collection of data alleged to be a subset of a larger corpus was posted to a dark web site and contained 5.2M email addresses along with names, nationalities, genders, dates of birth, phone numbers and physical addresses. Phone House has been threatened with further releases if a ransom is not paid.

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In April 2021, a large data set of 533 million Facebook users was made freely available for download. Encompassing approximately 20% of Facebook's subscribers, the data was allegedly obtained by exploiting a vulnerability Facebook advises they rectified in August 2019. The primary value of the data is the association of phone numbers to identities; whilst each record included phone, only 2.5 million contained an email address. Most records contained names and genders with many also including dates of birth, location, relationship status and employer.

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