In June 2018, the command and control server of a malicious botnet known as the “Trik Spam Botnet” was misconfigured such that it exposed the email addresses of more than 43 million people. The researchers who discovered the exposed Russian server believe the list of addresses was used to distribute various malware strains via malspam campaigns (emails designed to deliver malware).

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In June 2018, the Cybercrime Bureau of the Estonian Central Criminal Police contacted HIBP and asked for assistance in making a data set of 655k email addresses searchable. The Estonian police suspected the email addresses and passwords they obtained were being used to access mailboxes, cryptocurrency exchanges, cloud service accounts and other similar online assets. They've requested that individuals who find themselves in the data set and also identify that cryptocurrency has been stolen contact them at cybercrime@politsei.ee.

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In May 2018, the forum for Singaporean hardware company Creative Technology suffered a data breach which resulted in the disclosure of 483k unique email addresses. Running on an old version of vBulletin, the breach also disclosed usernames, IP addresses and salted MD5 password hashes. After being notified of the incident, Creative permanently shut down the forum.

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In May 2018, the Linux Forums website suffered a data breach which resulted in the disclosure of 276k unique email addresses. Running on an old version of vBulletin, the breach also disclosed usernames, IP addresses and salted MD5 password hashes. Linux Forums did not respond to multiple attempts to contact them about the breach.

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In May 2018, the website for the ticket distribution service Ticketfly was defaced by an attacker and was subsequently taken offline. The attacker allegedly requested a ransom to share details of the vulnerability with Ticketfly but did not receive a reply and subsequently posted the breached data online to a publicly accessible location. The data included over 26 million unique email addresses along with names, physical addresses and phone numbers.

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In May 2018, the South African website for viewing traffic fines online known as ViewFines suffered a data breach. Over 934k records containing 778k unique email addresses were exposed and included names, phone numbers, government issued IDs and passwords stored in plain text.

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In April 2018, news broke of a massive data breach impacting the Vietnamese company known as VNG after data was discovered being traded on a popular hacking forum where it was extensively redistributed. The breach dated back to an incident in May of 2015 and included of over 163 million customers. The data in the breach contained a wide range of personal attributes including usernames, birth dates, genders and home addresses along with unsalted MD5 hashes and 25 million unique email addresses. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In late 2011, a series of data breaches in China affected up to 100 million users, including 7.5 million from the gaming site known as 17173. Whilst there is evidence that the data is legitimate, due to the difficulty of emphatically verifying the Chinese breach it has been flagged as “unverified”. The data in the breach contains usernames, email addresses and salted MD5 password hashes and was provided with support from dehashed.com. Read more about Chinese data breaches in Have I been pwned.

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In approximately 2017, it's alleged that the Chinese gaming site known as TGBUS suffered a data breach that impacted over 10 million unique subscribers. Whilst there is evidence that the data is legitimate, due to the difficulty of emphatically verifying the Chinese breach it has been flagged as “unverified”. The data in the breach contains usernames, email addresses and salted MD5 password hashes and was provided with support from dehashed.com. Read more about Chinese data breaches in Have I been pwned.

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In October 2014, the game cheats website known as ILikeCheats suffered a data breach that exposed 189k accounts. The vBulletin based forum leaked usernames, IP and email addresses and weak MD5 hashes of passwords. The data was provided with support from dehashed.com.

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