In approximately February 2015, the home financing website MyFHA suffered a data breach which disclosed the personal information of nearly 1 million people. The data included extensive personal information relating to home financing including personal contact info, credit statuses, household incomes, loan amounts and notes on personal circumstances, often referring to legal issues, divorces and health conditions. Multiple parties contacted HIBP with the data after which MyFHA was alerted in mid-July and acknowledged the legitimacy of the breach then took the site offline.

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In July 2018, staff of the Lanwar gaming site discovered a data breach they believe dates back to sometime over the previous several months. The data contained 45k names, email addresses, usernames and plain text passwords. A Lanwar staff member self-submitted the breach to HIBP and has also contacted the relevant authorities about the incident after identifying a phishing attempt to extort Bitcoin from a user.

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In July 2018, UK-based ecommerce company Fashion Nexus suffered a data breach which exposed 1.4 million records. Multiple websites developed by sister company White Room Solutions were impacted in the breach amongst which were sites including Jaded London and AX Paris. The various sites exposed in the incident included a range of different data types including names, phone numbers, addresses and passwords stored as a mix of salted MD5 and SHA-1 as well as unsalted MD5 passwords. When asked by reporter Graham Cluley if a public statement on the incident was available, a one-word response of “No” was received.

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In June 2012, the multiplayer online game League of Legends suffered a data breach. At the time, the service had more than 32 million registered accounts and the breach affected various personal data attributes including “encrypted” passwords. In 2018, a 339k record subset of the data emerged with email addresses, usernames and plain text passwords, likely cracked from the original cryptographically protected ones.

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In June 2018, the marketing firm Exactis inadvertently publicly leaked 340 million records of personal data. Security researcher Vinny Troia of Night Lion Security discovered the leak contained multiple terabytes of personal information spread across hundreds of separate fields including addresses, phone numbers, family structures and extensive profiling data. The data was collected as part of Exactis' service as a “compiler and aggregator of premium business & consumer data” which they then sell for profiling and marketing purposes. A small subset of the exposed fields were provided to Have I Been Pwned and contained 132 million unique email addresses.

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In April 2018, the online entertainment site Funny Games suffered a data breach that disclosed 764k records including usernames, email and IP addresses and salted MD5 password hashes. The incident was disclosed to Funny Games in July who acknowledged the breach and identified it had been caused by legacy code no longer in use. The record count in the breach constitute approximately half of the user base.

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In April 2018, a credential stuffing list containing 111 million email addresses and passwords known as Pemiblanc was discovered on a French server. The list contained email addresses and passwords collated from different data breaches and used to mount account takeover attacks against other services. Read more about the incident.

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In June 2018, the World of Warcraft service Light's Hope suffered a data breach which they subsequently self-submitted to HIBP. Over 30K unique users were impacted and their exposed data included email addresses, dates of birth, private messages and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes.

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In May 2015, the Indian motoring website known as Gaadi had 4.3 million records exposed in a data breach. The data contained usernames, email and IP addresses, genders, the city of users as well as passwords stored in both plain text and as MD5 hashes. The site was previously reported as compromised on the Vigilante.pw breached database directory.

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In June 2018, the command and control server of a malicious botnet known as the “Trik Spam Botnet” was misconfigured such that it exposed the email addresses of more than 43 million people. The researchers who discovered the exposed Russian server believe the list of addresses was used to distribute various malware strains via malspam campaigns (emails designed to deliver malware).

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