In July 2020, the self-proclaimed “World's #1 Marketing Video Maker” Promo suffered a data breach which was then shared extensively on a hacking forum. The incident exposed 22 million records containing almost 15 million unique email addresses alongside IP addresses, genders, names and salted SHA-256 password hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In June 2020, the user-generated stories website Wattpad suffered a huge data breach that exposed almost 270 million records. The data was initially sold then published on a public hacking forum where it was broadly shared. The incident exposed extensive personal information including names and usernames, email and IP addresses, genders, birth dates and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes.

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In 2019, online marketplace for trading stickers, cards, toys, and other collectibles Quidd suffered a data breach. The breach exposed almost 4 million users' email addresses, usernames and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. The data was subsequently sold then redistributed extensively via hacking forums.

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In April 2016, the online food delivery service Foodora suffered a data breach which was then extensively redistributed online. The breach included the personal information of hundreds of thousands of customers from multiple countries including their names, delivery addresses, phone numbers and passwords stored as either a salted MD5 or a bcrypt hash.

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In January 2020, the math solving website Mathway suffered a data breach that exposed over 25M records. The data was subsequently sold on a dark web marketplace and included names, Google and Facebook IDs, email addresses and salted password hashes.

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In July 2018, the Indian self-drive car rental company Zoomcar suffered a data breach which was subsequently sold on a dark web marketplace in 2020. The breach exposed over 3.5M records including names, email and IP addresses, phone numbers and passwords stored as bcrypt hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In March 2020, a massive trove of personal information referred to as “Lead Hunter” was provided to HIBP after being found left exposed on a publicly facing Elasticsearch server. The data contained 69 million unique email addresses across 110 million rows of data accompanied by additional personal information including names, phone numbers, genders and physical addresses. At the time of publishing, the breach could not be attributed to those responsible for obtaining and exposing it. The data was provided to HIBP by dehashed.com.

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In January 2020, the mobile app to “compare anything” Wishbone suffered another data breach which followed their breach from 2016. An extensive amount of personal information including almost 10M unique email addresses alongside names, phone numbers geographic locations and other personal attributes were leaked online and extensively redistributed. Passwords stored as unsalted MD5 hashes were also included in the breach. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “All3in”.

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In mid-2019, news broke of an alleged LiveJournal data breach. This followed multiple reports of credential abuse against Dreamwith beginning in 2018, a fork of LiveJournal with a significant crossover in user base. The breach allegedly dates back to 2017 and contains 26M unique usernames and email addresses (both of which have been confirmed to exist on LiveJournal) alongside plain text passwords. An archive of the data was subsequently shared on a popular hacking forum in May 2020 and redistributed broadly. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “nano@databases.pw”.

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In December 2017, the pet care delivery service PetFlow suffered a data breach which consequently appeared for sale on a dark web marketplace. Almost 1M accounts were impacted and exposed email addresses and passwords stored as unsalted MD5 hashes. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “nano@databases.pw”.

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