In December 2021, Indian retailer Aditya Birla Fashion and Retail Ltd was breached and ransomed. The ransom demand was allegedly rejected and data containing 5.4M unique email addresses was subsequently dumped publicly on a popular hacking forum the next month. The data contained extensive personal customer information including names, phone numbers, physical addresses, DoBs, order histories and passwords stored as MD5 hashes. Employee data was also dumped publicly and included salary grades, marital statuses and religions. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “white_peacock@riseup.net”.

Source

In December 2021, the online booking service FlexBooker suffered a data breach that exposed 3.7 million accounts. The data included email addresses, names, phone numbers and for a small number of accounts, password hashes and partial credit card data. The data was found being actively traded on a popular hacking forum. FlexBooker has identified the breach as originating from a compromised account within their AWS infrastructure.

Source

In late 2021, email address and plain text password pairs from the rap mixtape website DatPiff appeared for sale on a popular hacking forum. The data allegedly dated back to an earlier breach and in total, contained almost 7.5M email addresses and cracked password pairs. The original data source allegedly contained usernames, security questions and answers and passwords stored as MD5 hashes with a static salt.

Source

In December 2021, logs from the RedLine Stealer malware were left publicly exposed and were then obtained by security researcher Bob Diachenko. The data included usernames, email addresses and plain text passwords.

Source

In October 2021, the Singaporean recruitment website Protemps suffered a data breach that exposed almost 50,000 unique email addresses. The impacted data includes names, email and physical addresses, phone numbers, passport numbers and passwords stored as unsalted MD5 hashes, among troves of other jobseeker data. The data was provided to HIBP by a source who requested it be attributed to “white_peacock@riseup.net”.

Source

In October 2020, a security researcher published a technique for scraping large volumes of data from Gravatar, the service for providing globally unique avatars . 167 million names, usernames and MD5 hashes of email addresses used to reference users' avatars were subsequently scraped and distributed within the hacking community. 114 million of the MD5 hashes were cracked and distributed alongside the source hash, thus disclosing the original email address and accompanying data.

Source

In March 2021, 4 million records sourced from IDC Games were shared on a public hacking forum. The data included usernames, email addresses and passwords stored as salted MD5 hashes.

Source

In mid-2021, Risk Based Security reported on a database sourced from Ducks Unlimited being traded online. The data dated back to January 2021 and contained 1.3M unique email addresses across both a membership list and a list of website users. Impacted data included names, phones numbers, physical addresses, dates of birth and passwords stored as unsalted MD5 hashes.

Source

In October 2021, security researcher Bob Diachenko discovered an exposed database he attributed to ActMobile, the operators of Dash VPN and FreeVPN. The exposed data included 1.6 million unique email addresses along with IP addresses and password hashes, all of which were subsequently leaked on a popular hacking forum. Although usage of the service was verified by HIBP subscribers, ActMobile denied the data was sourced from them and the breach has subsequently been flagged as “unverified”.

Source

During October 2021, 3.1 million email addresses with accounts on the cryptocurrency market capitalisation website CoinMarketCap were discovered being traded on hacking forums. Whilst the email addresses were found to correlate with CoinMarketCap accounts, it's unclear precisely how they were obtained. CoinMarketCap has provided the following statement on the data: “CoinMarketCap has become aware that batches of data have shown up online purporting to be a list of user accounts. While the data lists we have seen are only email addresses (no passwords), we have found a correlation with our subscriber base. We have not found any evidence of a data leak from our own servers — we are actively investigating this issue and will update our subscribers as soon as we have any new information.”

Source