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By Waqas It has been many days since a popular, semi-private BitTorrent tracker Demonoid has remained offline. The employees working for this website are also clueless about what’s happening and claim that the owner of Demonoid, Deimos, is also missing. None of them have had any contact with him for the past two months. Demonoid has been […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Demonoid goes offline with owner missing in action for last two months

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The U.S. Secret Service is warning financial institutions about a recent uptick in a form of ATM skimming that involves cutting cupcake-sized holes in a cash machine and then using a combination of magnets and medical devices to siphon customer account data directly from the card reader inside the ATM.

According to a non-public alert distributed to banks this week and shared with KrebsOnSecurity by a financial industry source, the Secret Service has received multiple reports about a complex form of skimming that often takes thieves days to implement.

This type of attack, sometimes called ATM “wiretapping” or “eavesdropping,” starts when thieves use a drill to make a relatively large hole in the front of a cash machine. The hole is then concealed by a metal faceplate, or perhaps a decal featuring the bank’s logo or boilerplate instructions on how to use the ATM.

A thin metal faceplate is often used to conceal the hole drilled into the front of the ATM. The PIN pad shield pictured here is equipped with a hidden spy camera.

Skimmer thieves will fish the card skimming device through the hole and attach it to the internal card reader via a magnet.

Thieves often use a magnet to secure their card skimmer in place above the ATM’s internal card reader. Image: U.S. Secret Service.

Very often the fraudsters will be assisted in the skimmer installation by an endoscope, a slender, flexible instrument traditionally used in medicine to give physicians a look inside the human body. By connecting a USB-based endoscope to his smart phone, the intruder can then peek inside the ATM and ensure that his skimmer is correctly attached to the card reader.

The Secret Service says once the skimmer is in place and the hole patched by a metal plate or plastic decal, the skimmer thieves often will wait a day or so to attach the pinhole camera. “The delay is believed to take place to ensure that vibrations from the drilling didn’t trigger an alarm from anti-skimming technology,” the alert reads.

When the suspect is satisfied that his drilling and mucking around inside the cash machine hasn’t set off any internal alarms, he returns to finish the job by retrofitting the ATM with a hidden camera. Often this is a false fascia directly in front of or above the PIN pad, recording each victim entering his or her PIN in a time-stamped video.

In other cases, the thieves may replace the PIN pad security shield on the ATM with a replica that includes a hidden pinhole camera, tucking the camera components behind the cut hole and fishing the camera wiring and battery through the hole drilled in the front of the machine.

The image on the left shows the spy camera guts and battery hidden behind the hole (this view is from the inside of the ATM, and the card reader is on the left). The image on the right shows a counterfeit PIN pad shield equipped with a hidden camera that is wired to the taped components pictured in the left image.

It’s difficult to cite all of the Secret Service’s report without giving thieves a precise blueprint on how to conduct these attacks. But I will say that several sources who spend a great deal of time monitoring cybercrime forums and communications have recently shared multiple how-to documents apparently making the rounds that lay out in painstaking detail how to execute these wiretapping attacks. So that knowledge is definitely being shared more widely in the criminal community now.

Overall, it’s getting tougher to spot ATM skimming devices, many of which are designed to be embedded inside various ATM components (e.g., insert skimmers). It’s best to focus instead on protecting your own physical security while at the cash machine. If you visit an ATM that looks strange, tampered with, or out of place, try to find another machine. Use only ATMs in public, well-lit areas, and avoid those in secluded spots.

Most importantly, cover the PIN pad with your hand when entering your PIN: That way, even if the thieves somehow skim your card, there is less chance that they will be able to snag your PIN as well. You’d be amazed at how many people fail to take this basic precaution.

Sure, there is still a chance that thieves could use a PIN-pad overlay device to capture your PIN, but in my experience these are far less common than hidden cameras (and quite a bit more costly for thieves who aren’t making their own skimmers). Done properly, covering the PIN pad with your hand could even block hidden cameras like those embedded in the phony PIN pad security shield pictured above.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbDdsUh_sTg]Fascinated by all things skimmer-related? Check out my series All About Skimmers for more images, videos and ingenious skimmer scams.

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By Waqas Cisco’s Talos researchers have identified that Russia’s VPNfilter is way more dangerous than it is believed to be. The malware, which prompted the FBI to urge people to reboot their internet routers, contains seven additional third-stage modules that are infecting countless global networking devices since 2016. The infected devices are mainly located in Ukraine as […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Fancy Bear’s VPNfilter malware is back with 7 new modules

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By Waqas Firefox has joined hands with Have I Been Pwned for this project. Mozilla introduced a new service earlier this year called Firefox Monitor, and now the company is adding a new feature to this service. The newly added feature will take scrutiny to a whole new level by allowing users to sign up for getting […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Firefox Monitor will Notify you When Your Account is Hacked- Mozilla

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By Uzair Amir Another day, another trove of sensitive data exposed online. This time, a MongoDB database containing a whopping 43.5GB of the dataset used in marketing campaigns has been left exposed for public access. The data was discovered by Bob Diachenko, an independent security researcher who noted that the database was available on an unprotected MongoDB hosted on Grupo-SMS hosting and […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: 11 million personal unprotected MongoDB records leaked online

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By Carolina There is little doubt that technology has influenced people’s lives in many ways. Not only are you more likely to have a mobile phone in your pocket, but you are also likely to use the internet many times per day. While technology has brought a lot of great ideas to business and the way people […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Exploring the Way Technology Has Changed Entertainment

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By Waqas Android is one of the most vulnerable mobile operating systems with hackers developing new Android malware and banking trojan every 17 seconds. Then, there is Google and questionable security measures to protect users from sophisticated and persistent malware attacks. Recently, Lukas Stefanko, an IT security researcher at ESET has discovered a nasty piece of banking trojan targeting […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Banking trojan found in call recorder app on Play Store – stole over €10,000

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By John Mason If you are a VPN user it is time to come out from the myth that every VPN is here to secure your privacy. Internet censorship is on the rise, and data from Freedom on the Net, based on an annual assessment of the situation of Internet freedom in 65 countries, reveals that not only […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Almost Every Major Free VPN Service is a Glorified Data Farm

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If you’re thinking of donating money to help victims of Hurricane Florence, please do your research on the charitable entity before giving: A slew of new domains apparently related to Hurricane Florence relief efforts are now accepting donations on behalf of victims without much accountability for how the money will be spent.

For the past two weeks, KrebsOnSecurity has been monitoring dozens of new domain name registrations that include the terms “hurricane” and/or “florence” and some word related to support (e.g., “relief,” “assistance,” etc.). Most of these domains have remained parked or dormant since their creation earlier this month; however, several of them became active only in the past few days, directing visitors to donate money through private PayPal accounts without providing any information about who is running the site or what will be done with donated funds.

The landing page for hurricaneflorencerelieffund-dot-com also is the landing page for at least 4 other Hurricane Florence donation sites that use the same anonymous PayPal address.

Among the earliest of these is hurricaneflorencerelieffund-dot-com, registered anonymously via GoDaddy on Sept. 13, 2018. Donations sent through the site’s PayPal page go to an email address tied to the PayPal account on the site (info@hurricaneflorencerelieffund-dot-com); emails to that address did not elicit a response.

Sometime in the past few days, several other Florence-related domains that were previous parked at GoDaddy now redirect to this domain, including hurricanflorence-dot-org (note the missing “e”); florencedisaster-dot-org; florencefunds-dot-com; and hurricaneflorencedonation-dot-com. All of these domains include the phone number 833-FLO-FUND, which rings to an automated system that ultimately asks the caller to leave a message. There is no information provided about the organization or individual running the sites.

The domain hurricaneflorencedisasterfund-dot-com has a slightly different look and feel, invokes the name of the Red Cross and also includes the 833-FLO-FUND number. Likewise, it accepts PayPal donations tied to the same email address mentioned above. It claims “80% of all donations go directly to FIRST RESPONDERS in North & South Carolina!” although it provides no clear way to verify that claim.

Hurricaneflorencedisasterfund-dot-com is one of several domains anonymously accepting PayPal donations, purportedly on behalf of Hurricane Florence victims.

The domain hurricaneflorencerelief-dot-fund, registered on Sept. 11, also accepts PayPal donations with minimal information about who might benefit from monies given. The site links to Facebook, Twitter and other social network accounts set up with the same name, although none of them appear to have any meaningful content. The email address tied to that PayPal account — hurricaneflorencerelief@gmail.com — did not respond to requests for comment.

The domain theflorencefund-dot-com until recently also accepted PayPal donations and had an associated Twitter account (now deleted), but that domain recently changed its homepage to include the message, “Due to the change in Florence’s path, we’re suspending our efforts.”

Here is a Google spreadsheet that tracks some of the domains I’ve been monitoring, including notations about whether the domains are active and if they point to sites that ask for donations. I’ll update this sheet as the days go by; if anyone has any updates to add, please drop a comment below. All of the domains mentioned above have been reported to the Justice Department’s National Center for Disaster Fraud, which accepts tips at disaster@leo.gov.

Let me be clear: Just because a site is listed here doesn’t mean it’s a scam (or that it will be). Some of these sites may have been set up by well-intentioned people; others appear to have been established by legitimate aid groups who are pooling their resources to assist local victims.

For example, several of these domains redirect to Freedomhouse.cc, a legitimate nonprofit religious group based in North Carolina that accepts donations through several domains that use an inline donation service from churchcommunitybuilder.com — a maker of “church management software.”

Another domain in this spreadsheet — florencereliefeffort.org — accepts donations on its site via a third party fundraising network Qgiv.com. The site belongs to a legitimate 501(c)(3) Muslim faith-based nonprofit in Raleigh, N.C, that is collecting money for Hurricane Florence victims.

If you’re familiar with these charities, great. Otherwise, it’s a good idea to research the charitable group before giving them money to help victims.

As The New York Times noted on Sept. 15, one way to do that is through Charity Navigator, which grades established charities on transparency and financial health, and has compiled a list of those active in the recovery from Florence. Other sites like GuideStar, the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance and Charity Watch perform similar reviews. You can find more details about how those sites work here.

Finally, remember that phishers and malware purveyors love to seize on the latest disasters to further their schemes. Never click on links or attachments in emails or social media messages that you weren’t expecting.

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By Waqas Unfortunately, unsuspected freelancers are falling for the malware scam. Fiverr and Freelancer.com are two of the most popular websites for freelancers and clients looking for skilled professionals. Currently, both sites have millions of registered users from hundreds of countries and that makes them lucrative targets for cybercriminals. Recently, security researchers at MalwareHunterTeam have discovered a new piece of […] This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Malware hits Freelancers at Fiverr and Freelancer.com

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