Baker McKenzie is pleased to invite you to our virtual annual conference Supply Chain Risks & Rewards in Emerging Markets.

In addition to providing the latest updates on regional and industry specific supply chain compliance developments, this webinar series will focus on cutting edge issues in supply chain risk management—including the key developments from the Biden Administration, trade considerations and the impact of the growing environmental, social and governance (ESG) movement. Professionals from various industries who represent a wide array of supply chain related fields will join us to share the latest best practices from the fast developing world of supply chain risk management.

All webinars will begin at 11:30 AM Central (US), will cover two topics, and are scheduled to run for approximately 90 minutes. If you reside in a different time zone and wish to verify your time please click on the following link: www.timeanddate.com.

All webinars are complimentary and you can register for as many as you would like.

Upcoming Webinar Dates and Topics
Click on links in agenda to register for each session
Thursday,
April 1
Supply Chain Conference Session I  
 The Biden Administration First 60 Days – significant supply chain regulatory impacts and what the future holds
 ESG and Supply Chains – today’s best practices to meet tomorrow’s legal obligations
Tuesday,
April 6
Supply Chain Conference Session II
 Data in the Supply Chain – key digitalization, cyber, and IP considerations
 Customs Regulations and Sanctions Around the World – the latest impact on corporate supply chains
Thursday,
April 8
Supply Chain Conference Session III
 Inoculating Supply Chains – restructuring in a world of disruption
 The Supply Chain Companies You Keep – practical considerations for efficiently managing growing third party legal risk

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In an 18 March 2021 statement released by the German Foreign Ministry, the Group of Seven (G7) nations have announced that they remain fully committed to the implementation of sanctions on Russia over the annexation of the Crimean Peninsula. The group’s Foreign Ministers also reaffirmed their unwavering support for and commitment to the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, and denounced Russia’s alleged occupation. See the full statement accessible here for further details.

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Join us for a cross-disciplinary discussion with our NA trade secrets partners on trade secrets enforcement issues that arise in export controls. The discussion is available here.  As part of the heightened enforcement of trade secrets theft allegations in the United States, the Commerce Department recently added several institutions and individuals to the Entity List based on alleged theft. The spotlight on trade secrets is a trend to watch, and our experts walk you through what you need to know to manage your supply chains.

The post United States: Avoiding the Entity List – Rise of trade secrets enforcement risk through US export controls appeared first on Global Compliance News.

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By Nikhil Singhvi S Cyber Technology Risk Consultant, Grant Thornton Bharat LLP

Today, organizations rely upon third-party service providers to deliver a wide range of services, which may include processing credit card data, billing for medical services, cloud hosting services, software as a service (SaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), etc.—almost anything can be outsourced in today’s extensive market.

The use of a third-party service provider may reduce management’s direct control over the activities at hand, but it simultaneously increases the need for oversight of those activities from start to finish. Without proper third-party risk management (TPRM), third parties may cause harm to their client’s customers, operations, reputation and—ultimately—their financial viability.

Global Outsourced Market:

 


Source: https://www.statista.com/statistics/189788/global-outsourcing-market-size/

Let’s look at some third-party-related data breaches and their consequences.

Major Supermarket

A major supermarket chain in the U.S. faced a cyber-attack in November 2013 that resulted in the theft of 70 million records, including details of their shoppers’ addresses and phone numbers, and the theft of 40 million debit and credit card details.
The initial intrusion into its systems was traced back to network credentials stolen from a third-party vendor, followed by a malware-laced email phishing attack sent to employees of that vendor organization.

It is estimated that the organization could be facing losses in excess of $400 million as a result of this breach, including reimbursement associated with banks recovering the costs of reissuing millions of cards; fines from the card brands for Payment Card Industry (PCI) non-compliance; and direct customer service costs, including legal fees and credit monitoring for tens of millions of customers impacted by the breach.

Infrastructure company fine under FCPA

A non-U.S. headquartered multinational corporation, with interests in electricity generation and transmission as well as rail transport, was fined $772 million USD in December 2014 for violations against the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (FCPA). This was a result of the inappropriate conduct of third parties as well as ineffective due diligence and corporate control over said third parties.

Bank fined £1.9 million in May 2019 as FCA and PRA focus on outsourcing failures

A small retail bank offering financial services, including prepaid card and charge card programs in the UK and Europe, suffered a TPRM-related incident in 2015. The bank’s card services are provided with the assistance of a third-party card processor. This third-party processor carries out services that are critical to the operation of the card program (e.g., authorizing and processing card transactions).

The third-party processor suffered an incident on Christmas Eve 2015, following a technology malfunction. The incident had widespread impact, with the third party not being able to provide authorization and processing services for more than eight hours. During this period, 3,367 customers were unable to use their prepaid cards and charge cards. In total, the card processor was unable to authorize 5,356 card transactions at ATM machines, point of sale terminals, and online.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) noted that the outsourcing agreement between the bank and their third party was not fit for disruptive events occurrence. Also criticized was the inadequate oversight and governance of the bank’s outsourcing arrangements.

Risk Landscape

Though the third-party threat landscape is broad, it is still finite. Proper planning will determine what risks play an important role in your organization and what mitigating controls are required. There are various types of risk an organization is exposed to:

  • Geographical Risk
  • Reputational Risk
  • Financial Risk
  • Digital Risk
  • Regulatory Risk
  • Security and Privacy Risk
  • Operational Risk
  • Strategic Risk
  • Business Continuity and Resiliency Risk

Third-Party Lifecycle

chart showing Lifecycle of Third Party

  • Strategy & Planning: Develop sourcing strategy, determine and define needs, consider cost/benefits.
  • Evaluate & Select: Perform a risk assessment to identify risk and perform due diligence.
  • Contract & On-board: Define contract terms; incorporate risk, compliance, performance requirement, and time frame.
  • Manage & Monitor: Monitor relationship and performance on a periodic basis and communicate to each and every vendor accordingly.
  • Terminate, Off-board, or Renew: End of contract, relationship or renewal.

HITRUST: A Unique Approach to Information Risk Management and Compliance

There are many standards which we can use as a basis for implementing and complying with Vendor Risk Management controls, such as:

  • NIST,
  • ISO 27001, and
  • COBIT

However, HITRUST has developed a variety of unique programs and solutions which can be leveraged by organizations of any size or complexity to aid in managing third-party risk, including:

  • The HITRUST Assessment XChange™, and
  • The HITRUST Third-Party Assurance Program.

The HITRUST Assessment XChange

The HITRUST Assessment XChange (the XChange) is a third-party risk management solution that is both comprehensive and modular, incorporating the three vital components of people, process, and technology. The XChange team streamlines and simplifies the process of managing and maintaining risk assessment and compliance information from third parties. Just a few benefits of using the XChange include:

  • Effectively engaging third parties and identifying the appropriate individual(s) responsible for responding to risk assessments and compliance information requests,
  • Educating third parties on TPRM processes and communicating expectations and requirements,
  • Facilitating real-time engagement between organizations and their third-party community via the XChange Manager portal,
  • Providing a consistent and transparent reporting mechanism that is backed by HITRUST’s Third-Party Risk Management Methodology, and
  • Facilitating the electronic delivery of completed risk assessments into an organization’s existing GRC or VRM platforms.

HITRUST Third-Party Assurance Program

The HITRUST Third-Party Assurance Program helps organizations streamline their third-party risk management processes by applying the HITRUST CSF® framework, which includes multiple standards, frameworks, and globally accepted best practices. An increasing number of organizations are now requiring their third parties to undergo a HITRUST assessment. By doing so, these organizations are reducing or eliminating their proprietary information security questionnaires and on-site audits for those third parties. Benefits of adopting a “One Framework, One Assessment” approach include:

  • Cost and time savings,
  • An always-evolving approach, found in the HITRUST TPRM Methodology, and
  • A comprehensive framework that enables evidence of compliance with multiple frameworks, regulations, and best practices.

With increases in reliance on third-party services, the need to manage third-party risk is greater than ever—and only becoming more prevalent. HITRUST can help ensure that your organization’s TPRM efforts are effective by offering streamlined solutions that help you obtain vital assurances of compliance and risk management from your third parties. For more information, visit our webpage or speak with a HITRUST professional by reaching out to info@hitrustalliance.net.

 


 

About the Author

Nikhil is a Certified CSF Practitioner and an Associate CISSP, CISM, and PCIP Qualified professional. He comes with experience in IT Risk Advisory and Cybersecurity, With rich domestic and international experience in areas of HITRUST Assessment, SOC 2 Audits, ISO 27001 Audit, Cyber Security maturity Assessments, IT General Controls reviews, and Information Security assessment. He has been working on BFSI and TMT vertical. He has a unique ability to bring both creativity and discipline to finding solutions for even the most complex challenges his clients face.

The post Third-Party Risk Management: A Globally Accepted Approach appeared first on HITRUST Alliance.

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Shelter-in-place or stay-at-home orders have been prevalent throughout the United States since March 2020 as state and local governments have sought to protect their citizens from the spread of the COVID-19 virus while at the same time reopen their economies in accordance with phased reopening plans. Keeping abreast of the evolving nature of these orders and plans as the spread of the virus continues to evolve is critical to the functioning of all businesses throughout the country.

Baker McKenzie has a team in place that has been advising clients real-time on these most critical issues since the first orders were enacted. We are pleased to provide this tracker, which identifies the relevant state-wide shelter-in-place orders and their related expiration dates, as well as the applicable state-wide reopening plans, in each of the 50 United States plus Washington, D.C. The “What’s Open” table on each page highlights the reopening status of four major sectors (office, manufacturing, retail and bars/restaurants).

In addition, the tracker includes links to the relevant quarantine requirements or recommendations for incoming travelers in each state plus Washington, D.C.

Key developments reflected in this week’s update to the tracker include the following:

  • The following jurisdictions extended their state-wide orders and/or the duration of the current phase of their reopening plans: Maryland, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Utah, Wyoming.
  • The following jurisdictions eased restrictions and/or advanced to the next phase of their reopening plan: Arizona, Colorado, Michigan, North Carolina and Virginia.
  • Arizona has lifted COVID-19 restrictions on businesses and events and prohibited, in most cases, enforcement of local mask mandates. Utah, on the other hand, has eliminated exceptions to physical distancing and face mask requirements in certain circumstances.

You can also view our brochure which highlights key areas of expertise where we can support your business’s tracking and reopening plans. Please call or email your regular Baker McKenzie contact if you require additional analysis regarding these matters.

Last updated 26 March 2021

The post United States: US 50 State Shelter-in-Place / Reopening Tracker appeared first on Global Compliance News.

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In brief

Shelter-in-place or stay-at-home orders have been prevalent throughout the United States since March 2020 as state and local governments have sought to protect their citizens from the spread of the COVID-19 virus while at the same time reopen their economies in accordance with phased reopening plans. Keeping abreast of the evolving nature of these orders and plans as the spread of the virus continues to evolve is critical to the functioning of all businesses throughout the country.


Baker McKenzie has a team in place that has been advising clients real-time on these most critical issues since the first orders were enacted. We are pleased to provide this Tracker, which identifies the relevant state-wide shelter-in-place orders and their related expiration dates, as well as the applicable state-wide reopening plans, in each of the 50 United States plus Washington, D.C. The “What’s Open” table on each page highlights the reopening status of four major sectors (office, manufacturing, retail and bars/restaurants).

In addition, the Tracker includes links to the relevant quarantine requirements or recommendations for incoming travelers in each state plus Washington, D.C.

Key developments reflected in this week’s update to the Tracker include the following:

  • The following jurisdictions extended their state-wide orders and/or the duration of the current phase of their reopening plans: Maryland, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Utah, Wyoming.
  • The following jurisdictions eased restrictions and/or advanced to the next phase of their reopening plan: Arizona, Colorado, Michigan, North Carolina and Virginia.
  • Arizona has lifted COVID-19 restrictions on businesses and events and prohibited, in most cases, enforcement of local mask mandates. Utah, on the other hand, has eliminated exceptions to physical distancing and face mask requirements in certain circumstances.

You can also view our brochure which highlights key areas of expertise where we can support your business’s tracking and reopening plans. Please call or email your regular Baker McKenzie contact if you require additional analysis regarding these matters.

Last updated 26 March 2021

Download US Shelter-In-Place / Reopening Tracker

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In brief

Welcome to Baker McKenzie’s new Labor and Employment video chat series for US employers. Our lawyers will provide quick, practical tips on today’s most pressing issues for US employers navigating the new normal.  The videos complement our blog, The Employer Report, which provides written legal updates and practical insights about the latest labor and employment issues affecting US multinationals, at both the domestic and global level.

Please click below to watch the video chats and be sure to let us know if there are additional topics you’d like us to address.


Speaker: Susan Eandi

Speakers: Melissa AllchinRobin Samuel, and Harry Valetk

Speakers:  Susan EandiEmily HarbisonKrissy Katzenstein

Speakers: William DuganRobin SamuelGoli Rahimi

Speakers: Michael BrewerTeresa Michaud

Speakers: Paul EvansBlair Robinson and Autumn Sharp.

Speakers: Elizabeth EbersoleCaroline Pham and Robin Samuel.

Speakers: Susan EandiEmily Harbison and Robin Samuel.

Speakers: Anna Brown, Susan Eandi and Emily Harbison.

Speakers: Caroline BurnettLara GrinesBlair Robinson, Autumn Sharp, Jeff Sturgeon.

Speakers: Caroline BurnettLara GrinesBlair Robinson, Autumn Sharp, Jeff Sturgeon.

If you’re looking for guidance related to the pandemic, please check out the below Reopening Playbook video chat series. It covers practical topics like masks in the workplace, expense reimbursement requirements, employee testing and screening and much more.

Reopening Playbook Video Chat Series

Speakers: Elizabeth EbersolePaul EvansRobin Samuel.

Speakers: Susan EandiPaul EvansEmily Harbison

Speakers: Emily HarbisonMichael BrewerRobin Samuel

Speakers: Susan EandiEmily HarbisonRobin Samuel

Speakers: Emily HarbisonPaul Evans , William Dugan

Speakers: Michael BrewerBillie Wenter

Speakers: Michael BrewerSusan EandiEmily Harbison

Speakers: Bradford NewmanJoseph DengBillie WenterRobin Samuel

Speakers: Susan EandiChristopher GuldbergBetsy MorganGrant Uhler

Speakers: Paul EvansRobin SamuelBillie Wenter

Speakers: Michael BrewerEmily HarbisonMichael Leggieri

Speakers: Michael BrewerPaul EvansJeffrey SturgeonBillie Wenter

Speakers: Anne BatterEmily HarbisonBenjamin Ho

Speakers: Michael BrewerJoe DengSusan Eandi

Speakers: Michael LeggieriTeresa MichaudBillie Wenter

Speakers: Paul EvansEmily HarbisonJeffrey Sturgeon

Speakers: William DuganEmily HarbisonBrian Hengesbaugh

Speakers: Susan EandiBenjamin HoChristopher GuldbergArthur Rooney

Speakers: Melissa AllchinWilliam DuganBetsy Morgan

Speakers: Joseph DengRobin Samuel

Speakers: Michael BrewerMark GoodmanTeresa Michaud

Speakers: Susan EandiPaul EvansEmily Harbison

Speakers: Christopher GuldbergBenjamin Ho

Speakers: Michael BrewerTeresa Michaud

Contact Information

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In brief

Please join us for a new weekly video series, hosted by Baker McKenzie’s North America Government Enforcement partners Tom Firestone and Jerome Tomas.

This weekly briefing is available on demand and will cover hot topics and current enforcement actions related to white collar crime and criminal investigations in the US and abroad to arm you with the information you need to start your business week.

As one of the largest global law firms, we will call upon our exceptionally deep and broad bench of white collar experts throughout the world and particularly in the commercial hubs of Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America to join our weekly discussion series.

These briefings will cover:

  • High-profile DOJ case updates and implications
  • SEC enforcement developments
  • CFTC enforcement developments
  • Other white collar defense industry developments

30 March 2021

Video Link

15 March 2021

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8 March 2021

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1 March 2021

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22 February 2021

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15 February 2021

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8 February 2021

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1 February 2021

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18 January 2021

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4 January 2021

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14 December 2020

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07 December 2020

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23 November 2020

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16 November 2020

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9 November 2020

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26 October 2020

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19 October 2020

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5 October 2020

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29 September 2020

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8 September 2020

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24 August 2020

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17 August 2020

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10 August 2020

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3 August 2020

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27 July 2020

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20 July 2020

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13 July 2020

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6 July 2020

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29 June 2020

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22 June 2020

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17 June 2020

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9 June 2020

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26 May 2020

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The EU and the US are committed to reach a comprehensive and durable negotiated solution to the Aircraft disputes. Key elements of a negotiated solution will include disciplines on future support in this sector, outstanding support measures, monitoring and enforcement, and addressing the trade distortive practices of and challenges posed by new entrants to the sector from non-market economies, such as China.

“These steps signal the determination of both sides to embark on a fresh start in the relationship.

The US tariffs were imposed pursuant to section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 to enforce US rights in the WTO dispute against the European Union (EU) and certain EU member States addressed to EU subsidies on LCA. The annual trade value of the list of tariff subheadings subject to additional duties was approximately $7.5 billion, which was consistent with the WTO Arbitrator’s finding on the appropriate level of countermeasures.

On March 16, 2021, USTR published in the Federal Register a notice modifying the action being taken in the LCA investigation by suspending the additional tariffs on goods of the European Union for a period of four months. The suspension is in accord with the above-mentioned joint US-EU statement that promotes a resolution of the large civil aircraft dispute. The additional duties on products of the European Union covered by the action taken in this investigation are suspended for a period of four months as of 12:01 a.m. (EST) on March 11, 2021.

To give effect to the USTR’s determination, as specified in the Annex to the notice, the additional duties imposed by subheadings 9903.89.05, 9903.89.07, 9903.89.10, 9903.89.13, 9903.89.16, 9903.89.19, 9903.89.22, 9903.89.25, 9903.89.28, 9903.89.31, 9903.89.34, 9903.89.37, 9903.89.40, 9903.89.43, 9903.89.46, 9903.89.52, 9903.89.55, 9903.89.57, 9903.89.59, 9903.89.61, and 9903.89.63, and as provided by their associated subchapter notes, will not apply to products of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden, that are entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m.(EST) on March 11, 2021, and before 12:01 a.m. (EDT) on July 11, 2021.

Any product of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden, that was admitted into a U.S. foreign trade zone in ‘privileged foreign status’ as defined in 19 CFR 146.41, before 12:01 a.m. (EST) on March 11, 2021, will remain subject to the applicable duties in subheadings 9903.89.05, 9903.89.07, 9903.89.10, 9903.89.13, 9903.89.16, 9903.89.19, 9903.89.22, 9903.89.25, 9903.89.28, 9903.89.31, 9903.89.34, 9903.89.37, 9903.89.40, 9903.89.43, 9903.89.46, 9903.89.52, 9903.89.55, 9903.89.57, 9903.89.59, 9903.89.61, and 9903.89.63 upon entry for consumption.

Any product of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden covered by subparagraph 2 of the Annex to this notice, that is admitted into a U.S. foreign trade zone on or after 12:01 a.m. (EST) on March 11, 2021, and before 12:01 a.m. (EDT) on July 11, 2021, may be admitted in any status, as applicable, as defined in 19 CFR 146, Subpart D.

The U.S. Trade Representative will continue to consider the action taken in this investigation.

Annex

Effective with respect to articles the product of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden that are entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern standard time on March 11, 2021, and entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, before 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on July 11, 2021:

  1. Note 21(a) to subchapter III of chapter 99 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States is modified by deleting “Except as provided in note 21(u) of this subdivision,” and by inserting “Except as provided in notes 21(u) and 21(v) of this subdivision,” in lieu thereof
  2. Note 21 to subchapter III of chapter 99 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States is modified by inserting in alphabetical order:

“(v) The U.S. Trade Representative has determined that additional duties imposed by subheadings 9903.89.05, 9903.89.07, 9903.89.10, 9903.89.13, 9903.89.16, 9903.89.19, 9903.89.22, 9903.89.25, 9903.89.28, 9903.89.31, 9903.89.34, 9903.89.37, 9903.89.40, 9903.89.43, 9903.89.46, 9903.89.52, 9903.89.55, 9903.89.57, 9903.89.59, 9903.89.61, and 9903.89.63 and as provided by their associated subchapter notes, shall not apply to articles the product of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden that are entered on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern standard time on March 11, 2021 and before 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on July 11, 2021.”

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On 12 March 2021, the Official Journal published Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/442 of 11 March 2021 making the exportation of certain products subject to the production of an export authorisation, which requires an export authorisation to export (or re-export after such goods have been subject to manufacturing operations including filling and packaging within the customs territory of the Union) vaccines against SARS-related coronaviruses (SARS-CoV species) currently falling under CN code 3002 20 10, irrespective of their packaging and active substances, including master and working cell banks used for the manufacture of such vaccines, currently falling under CN codes ex 2933 99 80, ex 2934 99 90, ex 3002 90 90 and ex 3504 00 90.

The export authorisation listing the number of doses shall be granted by the competent authorities of the Member State where products covered by the Regulation are manufactured and shall be issued in writing or by electronic means. For the purposes of the Regulation, manufacturing shall include the filling and packaging of vaccines. If the goods covered by this Regulation are manufactured outside the Union, the export authorisation shall be granted by the competent authorities of the Member State where the exporter is established.

Without the production of a valid export authorisation, the exportation of the goods covered by the Regulation shall be prohibited. The following exports shall not be subject to the export authorisation:

  • exports to Albania, Andorra, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Kosovo, Liechtenstein, Montenegro, Norway, North Macedonia, San Marino, Serbia, Switzerland, Vatican City, the overseas countries and territories listed in Annex II to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, Büsingen, Helgoland, Livigno, Ceuta and Melilla, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Egypt, Georgia, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Moldova, Morocco, Palestine, Syria, Tunisia, and Ukraine [Note: countries that form part of that customs territory, such as Monaco, need not to be exempted in order to receive unrestricted shipments from within the Union];
  • exports to low- and middle-income countries in the COVAX AMC list;
  • exports of goods purchased or delivered through COVAX, Unicef and PAHO with destination to any other COVAX participating country;
  • exports of goods purchased by Member States under the APAs entered into by the Union and donated or resold to a third country;
  • exports in the context of a humanitarian emergency response;
  • exports to facilities located on the continental shelf of a Member State or the exclusive economic zone declared by a Member State pursuant to UNCLOS.

The request for export authorisation shall contain the information set out in Annex I to the Regulation and the applicable TARIC additional codes in Annex II. In addition it shall also contain information on the number of vaccine doses of goods covered by this Regulation distributed in the Union since 1 December 2020 broken down by Member State as well as information on the number of vaccine doses of goods covered by this Regulation distributed in Northern Ireland since the entry into force of Implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/111.

The Regulation shall enter into force on 13 March 2021 and apply until 30 June 2021.

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