In June 2019, ThreatFabric analysts found a new Android malware, dubbed “Cerberus”, being rented out on underground forums. Its authors claim that it was used for private operations for two years preceding the start of the rental. They also state that the code is written from scratch and is not using parts of other existing banking Trojans unlike many other Trojans that are either based completely on the source of another Trojan (such as the leaked Anubis source code that is now being resold) or at least borrow parts of other Trojans. After thorough analysis we can confirm that Cerberus was indeed not based on the Anubis source code.

REFERENCE:
https://www.threatfabric.com/blogs/cerberus-a-new-banking-trojan-from-the-underworld.html
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We find that malware developers give descriptive names to their folders and code projects, often describing the capabilities of the malware in development. These descriptive names thus show up in a PDB path when a malware project is compiled with symbol debugging information. Everyone loves an origin story, and debugging information gives us insight into the malware development environment, a small, but important keyhole into where and how a piece of malware was born. We can use our newfound insight to detect malicious activity based in part on PDB paths and other debug details.

REFERENCE:
https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2019/08/definitive-dossier-of-devilish-debug-details-part-one-pdb-paths-malware.html

Symantec recently spotted a new tactic being used by apps on the Google Play Store to stealthily perform ad-clicking on users’ devices. A developer known as Idea Master has published two popular apps on the Play Store in the past year, with a collective download count of approximately 1.5 million. Symantec has informed Google of the observed behavior and the apps have now been removed from the Play Store. The two apps, a notepad app (Idea Note: OCR Text Scanner, GTD, Color Notes) and a fitness app (Beauty Fitness: daily workout, best HIIT coach), are packed using legitimate packers originally developed to protect the intellectual property of Android applications. Android packers can change the entire structure and flow of an Android Package Kit (APK) file, which complicates things for security researchers who want to decipher the APK’s behavior. This also explains the developer’s ability to remain on the Play Store performing malicious acts under the radar for nearly a year before being detected.

REFERENCE:
https://www.symantec.com/blogs/threat-intelligence/stealthy-ad-clicking-apps-google-play

Despite having an apparent lull in the first half of 2019, phishing will remain a staple in a cybercriminal’s arsenal, and they’re not going to stop using it. The latest example is a phishing campaign dubbed Heatstroke, based on a variable found in their phishing kit code. Heatstroke demonstrates how far phishing techniques have evolved — from merely mimicking legitimate websites and using diversified social engineering tactics — with its use of more sophisticated techniques such as steganography.

REFERENCE:
https://blog.trendmicro.com/trendlabs-security-intelligence/heatstroke-campaign-uses-multistage-phishing-attack-to-steal-paypal-and-credit-card-information/

“BRATA” is a new Android remote access tool malware family. We used this code name based on its description – “Brazilian RAT Android”. It exclusively targets victims in Brazil: however, theoretically it could also be used to attack any other Android user if the cybercriminals behind it want to. It has been widespread since January 2019, primarily hosted in the Google Play store, but also found in alternative unofficial Android app stores. For the malware to function correctly, it requires at least Android Lollipop 5.0 version.

REFERENCE:
https://securelist.com/spying-android-rat-from-brazil-brata/92775/
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Secureworks® Counter Threat Unit™ (CTU) researchers continually monitor the TrickBot botnet operated by the GOLD BLACKBURN threat group. A key feature of TrickBot is its ability to manipulate web sessions by intercepting network traffic before it is rendered by a victim's browser. TrickBot has targeted hundreds of organizations, mostly financial institutions, since it began widespread operation in October 2016. In August 2019, the dynamic webinjects used by TrickBot were augmented to include the following U.S.-based mobile carriers: Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, Sprint

REFERENCE:
https://www.secureworks.com/blog/trickbot-modifications-target-us-mobile-users
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TrickBot

Orcus RAT and RevengeRAT are two of the most popular remote access trojans (RATs) in use across the threat landscape. Since its emergence in 2016, various adversaries used RevengeRAT to attack organizations and individuals around the world. The source code associated with RevengeRAT was previously released to the public, allowing attackers to leverage it for their own malicious purposes. There are typically numerous, unrelated attackers attempting to leverage this RAT to compromise corporate networks for the purposes of establishing an initial point of network access, the performance of lateral movement, as well as to exfiltrate sensitive information that can be monetized. Orcus RAT was in the news earlier this year due to Canadian law enforcement activity related to the individual believed to have authored the malware.

REFERENCE:
https://blog.talosintelligence.com/2019/08/rat-ratatouille-revrat-orcus.html#more

ESET researchers have discovered the first known spyware that is built on the foundations of AhMyth open-source malware and has circumvented Google’s app-vetting process. The malicious app, called Radio Balouch aka RB Music, is actually a fully working streaming radio app for Balouchi music enthusiasts, except that it comes with a major sting in its tail – stealing personal data of its users. The app snuck into the official Android app store twice, but was swiftly removed by Google both times after we alerted the company to it.

REFERENCE:
https://www.welivesecurity.com/2019/08/22/first-spyware-android-ahmyth-google-play/

In December 2018, Amnesty International documented widespread targeted phishing attacks against human rights defenders (HRDs) in the Middle-East and North Africa, in the report “When Best Practice Isn't Good Enough”. That report documented how attackers had specifically developed techniques to target HRDs who had taken extra steps to secure their online accounts, such as by using more secure, privacy-respecting email providers, or enabling two-factor authentication on their online accounts. Following this, in July 2019, HRDs again shared with Amnesty International numerous new malicious emails they had received, that revealed a renewed campaign of targeted phishing we believe to be orchestrated by the same attackers or by a closely related group.

REFERENCE:
https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/research/2019/08/evolving-phishing-attacks-targeting-journalists-and-human-rights-defenders-from-the-middle-east-and-north-africa/
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Anomali researchers recently observed a site masquerading as a login page for a diplomatic portal linked to the French government. Further analysis of the threat actor’s infrastructure uncovered a broader phishing campaign targeting three different countries’ Ministry of Foreign Affairs agencies. Also targeted were four research-oriented organisations including: Stanford University, the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), a United Kingdom-based think tank, Congressional Research Service (CRS), a United States-based think tank, and five different email service providers. There is an overlap of infrastructure with known North Korean actors, including the same domain and shared hosting provider. Because of the links between one of the victims and their work on North Korean sanctions, they expect to see malicious actors continue to target the international staff involved in a similar official capacity.

REFERENCE:
https://www.anomali.com/blog/suspected-north-korean-cyber-espionage-campaign-targets-multiple-foreign-ministries-and-think-tanks#When:14:00:00Z
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